Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson: Chapter 1 (2023)

Story of the Door


Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was
never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in
discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and
yet somehow lovable.At friendly meetings, and when the wine was
to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye;
something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but
which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner
face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life.He was
austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a
taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theater, had not
crossed the doors of one for twenty years.But he had an approved
tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at
the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in
any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove."I incline
to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly:"I let my brother go
to the devil in his own way."In this character, it was
frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and
the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men.And to
such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never
marked a shade of change in his demeanour.

No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was
undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be
founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature.It is the mark
of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the
hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way.His friends
were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the
longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they
implied no aptness in the object.Hence, no doubt the bond that
united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the
well-known man about town.It was a nut to crack for many, what
these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find
in common.It was reported by those who encountered them in their
Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull and
would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend.For
all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions,
counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside
occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business,
that they might enjoy them uninterrupted.

It chanced on one of these rambles that their way led them
down a by-street in a busy quarter of London.The street was
small and what is called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on
the weekdays.The inhabitants were all doing well, it seemed and
all emulously hoping to do better still, and laying out the
surplus of their grains in coquetry; so that the shop fronts stood
along that thoroughfare with an air of invitation, like rows of
smiling saleswomen.Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more
florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street
shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a
forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished
brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly
caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.

Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east the
line was broken by the entry of a court; and just at that point a
certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the
street.It was two storeys high; showed no window, nothing but a
door on the lower storey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall
on the upper; and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged
and sordid negligence.The door, which was equipped with neither
bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained.Tramps slouched
into the recess and struck matches on the panels; children kept
shop upon the steps; the schoolboy had tried his knife on the
mouldings; and for close on a generation, no one had appeared to
drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.

Mr. Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the
by-street; but when they came abreast of the entry, the former
lifted up his cane and pointed.

(Video) Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde | Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis | Robert Louis Stevenson

"Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his
companion had replied in the affirmative."It is connected in my
mind," added he, "with a very odd story."

"Indeed?" said Mr. Utterson, with a slight change of voice,
"and what was that?"

"Well, it was this way," returned Mr. Enfield:"I was coming
home from some place at the end of the world, about three o'clock
of a black winter morning, and my way lay through a part of town
where there was literally nothing to be seen but lamps.Street
after street and all the folks asleep--street after street, all
lighted up as if for a procession and all as empty as a church--
till at last I got into that state of mind when a man listens and
listens and begins to long for the sight of a policeman.All at
once, I saw two figures:one a little man who was stumping along
eastward at a good walk, and the other a girl of maybe eight or
ten who was running as hard as she was able down a cross street.
Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough at the
corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the man
trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on
the ground.It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see.
It wasn't like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.I gave
a few halloa, took to my heels, collared my gentleman, and brought
him back to where there was already quite a group about the
screaming child.He was perfectly cool and made no resistance,
but gave me one look, so ugly that it brought out the sweat on me
like running.The people who had turned out were the girl's own
family; and pretty soon, the doctor, for whom she had been sent
put in his appearance.Well, the child was not much the worse,
more frightened, according to the Sawbones; and there you might
have supposed would be an end to it.But there was one curious
circumstance.I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first
sight.So had the child's family, which was only natural.But
the doctor's case was what struck me.He was the usual cut and
dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong
Edinburgh accent and about as emotional as a bagpipe.Well, sir,
he was like the rest of us; every time he looked at my prisoner, I
saw that Sawbones turn sick and white with desire to kill him.I
knew what was in his mind, just as he knew what was in mine; and
killing being out of the question, we did the next best.We told
the man we could and would make such a scandal out of this as
should make his name stink from one end of London to the other.
If he had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should
lose them.And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot,
we were keeping the women off him as best we could for they were
as wild as harpies.I never saw a circle of such hateful faces;
and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black sneering
coolness--frightened to, I could see that--but carrying it
off, sir, really like Satan.`If you choose to make capital out
of this accident,' said he, `I am naturally helpless.No
gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,' says he.`Name your
figure.'Well, we screwed him up to a hundred pounds for the
child's family; he would have clearly liked to stick out; but
there was something about the lot of us that meant mischief, and
at last he struck.The next thing was to get the money; and where
do you think he carried us but to that place with the
door?--whipped out a key, went in, and presently came back with
the matter of ten pounds in gold and a cheque for the balance on
Coutts's, drawn payable to bearer and signed with a name that I
can't mention, though it's one of the points of my story, but it
was a name at least very well known and often printed.The figure
was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that if it was
only genuine.I took the liberty of pointing out to my gentleman
that the whole business looked apocryphal, and that a man does
not, in real life, walk into a cellar door at four in the morning
and come out with another man's cheque for close upon a hundred
pounds.But he was quite easy and sneering.`Set your mind at
rest,' says he, `I will stay with you till the banks open and cash
the cheque myself.'So we all set of, the doctor, and the child's
father, and our friend and myself, and passed the rest of the
night in my chambers; and next day, when we had breakfasted, went
in a body to the bank.I gave in the cheque myself, and said I
had every reason to believe it was a forgery.Not a bit of it.
The cheque was genuine."

"Tut-tut," said Mr. Utterson.

"I see you feel as I do," said Mr. Enfield."Yes, it's a bad
story.For my man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with,
a really damnable man; and the person that drew the cheque is the
very pink of the proprieties, celebrated too, and (what makes it
worse) one of your fellows who do what they call good.Black mail
I suppose; an honest man paying through the nose for some of the
capers of his youth.Black Mail House is what I call the place
with the door, in consequence.Though even that, you know, is far
from explaining all," he added, and with the words fell into a
vein of musing.

From this he was recalled by Mr. Utterson asking rather
suddenly:"And you don't know if the drawer of the cheque lives
there?"

(Video) The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Chapter 1

"A likely place, isn't it?" returned Mr. Enfield."But I
happen to have noticed his address; he lives in some square or
other."

"And you never asked about the--place with the door?" said
Mr. Utterson.

"No, sir:I had a delicacy," was the reply."I feel very
strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style
of the day of judgment.You start a question, and it's like
starting a stone.You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away
the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird
(the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his
own back garden and the family have to change their name.No sir,
I make it a rule of mine:the more it looks like Queer Street, the
less I ask."

"A very good rule, too," said the lawyer.

"But I have studied the place for myself," continued Mr.
Enfield."It seems scarcely a house.There is no other door, and
nobody goes in or out of that one but, once in a great while, the
gentleman of my adventure.There are three windows looking on the
court on the first floor; none below; the windows are always shut
but they're clean.And then there is a chimney which is generally
smoking; so somebody must live there.And yet it's not so sure;
for the buildings are so packed together about the court, that
it's hard to say where one ends and another begins."

The pair walked on again for a while in silence; and then
"Enfield," said Mr. Utterson, "that's a good rule of yours."

(Video) The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde summary in hindi by Robert Louis Stevenson

"Yes, I think it is," returned Enfield.

"But for all that," continued the lawyer, "there's one point I
want to ask:I want to ask the name of that man who walked over
the child."

"Well," said Mr. Enfield, "I can't see what harm it would do.
It was a man of the name of Hyde."

"Hm," said Mr. Utterson."What sort of a man is he to see?"

"He is not easy to describe.There is something wrong with his
appearance; something displeasing, something down-right
detestable.I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce
know why.He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong
feeling of deformity, although I couldn't specify the point.He's
an extraordinary looking man, and yet I really can name nothing
out of the way.No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can't
describe him.And it's not want of memory; for I declare I can
see him this moment."

Mr. Utterson again walked some way in silence and obviously
under a weight of consideration."You are sure he used a key?" he
inquired at last.

(Video) The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Chapter 1) | Audiobook

"My dear sir ..." began Enfield, surprised out of himself.

"Yes, I know," said Utterson; "I know it must seem strange.
The fact is, if I do not ask you the name of the other party, it
is because I know it already.You see, Richard, your tale has
gone home.If you have been inexact in any point you had better
correct it."

"I think you might have warned me," returned the other with a
touch of sullenness."But I have been pedantically exact, as you
call it.The fellow had a key; and what's more, he has it still.
I saw him use it not a week ago."

Mr. Utterson sighed deeply but said never a word; and the
young man presently resumed."Here is another lesson to say
nothing,"said he."I am ashamed of my long tongue.Let us make
a bargain never to refer to this again."

"With all my heart," said the lawyer.I shake hands on that,
Richard."

FAQs

What happens in chapter 1 of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde? ›

Chapter 1 - Story of the Door

Utterson and Enfield are out for a walk when they pass a strange-looking door (the entrance to Dr Jekyll's laboratory). Enfield recalls a story involving the door. In the early hours of one winter morning, he says, he saw a man trampling on a young girl.

Why is Jekyll and Hyde chapter 1 Important? ›

Why is this chapter important? It introduces Utterson, from whose point of view we will see much of the action. Hyde is introduced through Enfield's narrative . We see him acting violently, and everyone finding him repellent.

What is the first chapter of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde? ›

Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Chapter 1: “Story of the Door” Summary & Analysis | SparkNotes.

How does Stevenson present mystery in chapter 1? ›

In the opening chapter he juxtaposes the 'sinister' door that is 'blistered' and 'distained' against a very pleasant street. The adjectives used imply that the door is a place of pain and is a menacing and threatening residence.

Why is chapter 1 titled The Story of the door? ›

Let us remember that the chapter is entitled 'The Story of the Door'; the phrase is metaphorical: for a 'generation' (about 20/5 years), Jekyll has failed to maintain the property and propriety!

What is Utterson's first name? ›

Mr. Gabriel John Utterson.

Why was the child out at 3am in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Why was the child out at 3 a.m.? She was running across the street.

How is duality presented in Jekyll and Hyde chapter 1? ›

The theme of duality is one of the most prominent in the text. The novella is concerned with how an upstanding member of society can become a savage criminal. Stevenson shocks the reader by first presenting Jekyll and Hyde as two separate characters and then revealing that they are the same person.

What is Stevenson saying about human nature? ›

Stevenson portrays the duplicity of human nature through the use of theme in the injury of an innocent, development of a habit, and victory of evil. All in all, Stevenson portrays the duplicity of human nature through the use of theme in the injury of an innocent.

How does Jekyll turn into Hyde? ›

Lanyon's and Jekyll's documents reveal that Jekyll had secretly developed a potion to allow him to separate the good and evil aspects of his personality. He was thereby able at will to change into his increasingly dominant evil counterpart, Mr. Hyde.

Why does Utterson drink gin? ›

5/ Utterson drinks gin to 'mortify' a taste for vintages. Mortify - to subdue, to feel embarrassed or ashamed or from the Latin 'mort' with links to decaying of the flesh. There's multiple readings here but ultimately he's repressing his true desire for expensive alcohol.

Who reached the girl in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Tramps sit in the recess of the neglected door. Enfield witness Hyde trampling the girl at three in the morning. This happened in winter. Both the girl's family and a doctor arrived (accept answers which include Enfield).

What does the door represent in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

In The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, doors represent good and evil, points of access and barriers, and symbols of character.

How is the name Hyde significant? ›

Hyde, as his name indicates, represents the fleshy (sexual) aspect of man which the Victorians felt the need to "hide" — as Utterson once punned on his name: "Well, if he is Mr. Hyde, I will be Mr. Seek." Hyde actually comes to represent the embodiment of pure evil merely for the sake of evil.

How is Mr Hyde described? ›

Mr Hyde is described as devilish, evil, and a criminal mastermind. His first appearance in the novel shows him violently trampling a young girl. His violence continues, and he eventually murders Sir Danvers Carew.

How is the door described in chapter 1? ›

It was two stories high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower story and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper; and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence. The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained.

How is Mr Utterson presented in chapter1? ›

“Mr Utterson the lawyer was a man of rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow loveable.” 1. Utterson's physical appearance is described as being of 'rugged countenance'.

How is horror shown in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Stevenson establishes scenes to create horror throughout the novella as a whole. This can be seen in 'The Story of the Door' when Hyde 'trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming. ' The juxtaposition between the verb 'trampled' and the adverb 'calmly' aids in conveying a sense of horror.

What does the name Jekyll mean? ›

Jekyll in Pop Culture

Surnamefrom a Celtic male personal name (akin to Breton Judicaël) meaning literally 'generous lord'.

Was Jekyll a real person? ›

The legendary Deacon Brodie (1741-1788), one of Edinburgh's most fascinating characters, the real life inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson's book Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

How old is Jekyll? ›

The protagonist of the play. As Jekyll, he is a fifty year old Doctor, fascinated by the workings of the human brain and intrigued by notes he has discovered in a book left by his late father, outlining a way by which a man may separate the two opposing elements of his personality.

Who identifies Carew's body? ›

Chapter four: The Carew murder case

Half of a broken walking stick and a letter addressed to Utterson were found by the body. Utterson identifies the body of Carew and goes with the police officer, Inspector Newcomen, to Hyde's rooms in a poor part of London.

What does Lanyon give to Utterson before he dies? ›

What does Lanyon give Utterson before he dies? A letter, not to be opened until Jekyll death or disappearance.

How much money does Hyde pay the girl and her family? ›

Enfield forced Hyde to pay her family £100 to avoid a scandal. Hyde brought Enfield to this door and gave him a cheque signed by a reputable gentleman later revealed to be Doctor Henry Jekyll, Utterson's friend and client.

What is the main message in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Theme: The duality of human nature:

Stevenson writes about the duality of human nature – the idea that every single human being has good and evil within them. Stevenson describes how there is a good and an evil side to everyone's personality, but what is important is how you behave and the decisions you make.

Why did Dr Jekyll want to separate the two sides of his character? ›

Jekyll's goal in his experiments is to separate these two elements, creating a being of pure good and a being of pure evil. In this way he seeks to free his good side from dark urges while liberating his wicked side from the pangs of conscience.

How is good and evil shown in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

In Jekyll's case, his good side is dominant, but he knows there is evil inside of him. A real life example of separating good and bad is our justice system. Police put convicts in prison to allow innocent citizens to go live freely. Hyde is a character of Jekyll's evil characteristics.

Is Mr. Hyde a human? ›

This side becomes active through the persona of Mr Hyde - a criminal man who commits cruel acts of violence against others. Through this change in Jekyll's character, Stevenson shows the duality in human nature - the idea that everyone is capable of good and evil deeds.

How is Jekyll described? ›

Henry Jekyll. A respected doctor and friend of both Lanyon, a fellow physician, and Utterson, a lawyer. Jekyll is a seemingly prosperous man, well established in the community, and known for his decency and charitable works. Since his youth, however, he has secretly engaged in unspecified dissolute and corrupt behavior ...

Why is duality important in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

The duality of human nature is the main theme of the novel. This is the idea that every human being has good and evil within them. Stevenson shows this duality in the novel with Dr Jekyll's experiment, but we learn that ultimately what is important is how you behave and the decisions that you make.

Who is more evil Jekyll or Hyde? ›

Jekyll is a kind and respected English doctor who has repressed evil urges inside of him. In an attempt to hide this, he develops a type of serum that he believes will effectively mask his dark side. Instead, Jekyll transforms into Edward Hyde, the physical and mental manifestation of his evil personality.

What crimes did Mr Hyde commit? ›

He is violent and commits terrible crimes - the trampling of an innocent young girl and the murder of Carew. He is unforgiving and doesn't repent for his crimes and sins. He is selfish and wishes for complete dominance over Jekyll.

Is Mr Hyde a monster? ›

Although Mr Hyde is invariably depicted as a huge monster, in the original book he is described as being slightly smaller physically than Dr. Jekyll, since the evil part of his personality was the lesser part.

Is Mr Utterson an alcoholic? ›

Utterson is a man of high respectability, but does not meet the bar set by Victorian society. Though in the public eye he is highly regarded, behind closed doors he is an alcoholic. He “drank gin when he was alone,” which would be an act unacceptable to society (Stevenson 5).

What were Jekyll's desires? ›

Jekyll wished to remove his dark side, tampering with the duality of man. He expressed hatred towards is his darker side. It shows this in the quote “many a man would have even blazoned such irregularities as i was guilty of;... I regarded and hid them with an almost morbid sense of shame.”

What are Hydes key quotes? ›

Hyde Quotes
  • "the bones were audibly shattered"
  • "with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim"
  • "I mauled the unresisting body, tasting delight from every blow"
  • "trampled calmly over the child's body"
  • "he smote her in the face"
20 May 2017

Who are Jekyll's two oldest friends? ›

Lanyon and Mr. Utterson are two of Dr. Jekyll's best and oldest friends.

What happens at the end of Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Jekyll tries to control his alter ego, Hyde, and for a while, Jekyll has the power. However, towards the end of the novel, Hyde takes over and this results in their deaths.

What does Satan's signature mean? ›

By having his 'signature upon his face' it suggests that Satan has already signed him over the dark side and sealed his fate as someone who is bound by malice and brutality.

What happens in chapter 2 of Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Summary — Chapter 2: “Search for Mr. Hyde” Utterson, prompted by his conversation with Enfield, goes home to study a will that he drew up for his close friend Dr. Jekyll.

How is duality presented in Jekyll and Hyde chapter 1? ›

The theme of duality is one of the most prominent in the text. The novella is concerned with how an upstanding member of society can become a savage criminal. Stevenson shocks the reader by first presenting Jekyll and Hyde as two separate characters and then revealing that they are the same person.

What happens in chapter 3 of Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Chapter three: Dr Jekyll was quite at ease

Utterson tells Jekyll he has talked to Hyde. He offers to help Jekyll escape from whatever trouble has him mixed up with Hyde. Jekyll refuses to talk about the matter, saying Utterson does not and cannot understand, but that he can be rid of Hyde if he wants.

What happens in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde? ›

Jekyll tries to control his alter ego, Hyde, and for a while, Jekyll has the power. However, towards the end of the novel, Hyde takes over and this results in their deaths.

What happens in chapter 4 of Jekyll and Hyde? ›

Summary — Chapter 4: “The Carew Murder Case”

Hyde, encounter a polite, aged gentleman; when the gentleman offers Hyde a greeting, Hyde suddenly turns on him with a stick, beating him to death. The police find a letter addressed to Utterson on the dead body, and they consequently summon the lawyer.

Why is chapter 2 of Jekyll and Hyde important? ›

Chapter two: Search for Mr Hyde

It introduces Lanyon and his disagreement with Jekyll over their differing views of science. Science is an important theme in the novella. We first encounter Hyde, and see that he is as unnatural as Enfield said. The idea that Hyde is blackmailing Jekyll begins to be treated as a fact.

How old is Jekyll? ›

The protagonist of the play. As Jekyll, he is a fifty year old Doctor, fascinated by the workings of the human brain and intrigued by notes he has discovered in a book left by his late father, outlining a way by which a man may separate the two opposing elements of his personality.

What Jekyll means? ›

Dr Jekyll comes to represent the good side of human nature while Mr Hyde represents the evil side. The tipping point of the story comes when Hyde murders Sir Danvers Carew. Evil triumphs over good and Jekyll loses control over the opposing sides of his nature.

Why did Dr Jekyll want to separate the two sides of his character? ›

Jekyll's goal in his experiments is to separate these two elements, creating a being of pure good and a being of pure evil. In this way he seeks to free his good side from dark urges while liberating his wicked side from the pangs of conscience.

How is good and evil shown in Jekyll and Hyde? ›

In Jekyll's case, his good side is dominant, but he knows there is evil inside of him. A real life example of separating good and bad is our justice system. Police put convicts in prison to allow innocent citizens to go live freely. Hyde is a character of Jekyll's evil characteristics.

How is Jekyll described chapter 5? ›

Jekyll, "looking deadly sick." He is alone and sitting beside a fireplace in a dim, dusty-windowed room. Utterson asks him if he has heard the news about Sir Danvers.

Why is chapter 3 of Jekyll and Hyde important? ›

Chapter three: Dr Jekyll was quite at ease

We first encounter Jekyll in person after hearing accounts of him from other characters. The split between Jekyll and Lanyon is reinforced, this time with Jekyll's view of their difference of opinion. Jekyll gives various clues as to his relationship with Hyde.

How is Hyde presented in chapter1? ›

Hyde is described as a 'little man' who was 'stumping', suggesting his walk is stiff and angry. Hyde's response to the crowd's anger is 'sneering coolness', suggesting contempt and detachment. Hyde created a 'desire to kill him' in even the most level-headed people (the doctor).

What crimes did Mr Hyde commit? ›

He is violent and commits terrible crimes - the trampling of an innocent young girl and the murder of Carew. He is unforgiving and doesn't repent for his crimes and sins. He is selfish and wishes for complete dominance over Jekyll.

Is Mr Hyde a monster? ›

Although Mr Hyde is invariably depicted as a huge monster, in the original book he is described as being slightly smaller physically than Dr. Jekyll, since the evil part of his personality was the lesser part.

Why did Jekyll create Hyde? ›

Lanyon's and Jekyll's documents reveal that Jekyll had secretly developed a potion to allow him to separate the good and evil aspects of his personality. He was thereby able at will to change into his increasingly dominant evil counterpart, Mr. Hyde.

Videos

1. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Part 1 of 5 - Chapters 1-3 - STORY OF THE DOOR
(John Adams)
2. Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde - Chapter 1: The Story of the Door.
(Darren Gibb)
3. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Chapter 1
(Reading Rosie)
4. DR.JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE ch.1-9 by Robert Louis Stevenson
(LE4EL)
5. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Audiobook Chapter 1
(ABLib)
6. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Chapter 1: The Story of the Door
(Ms Bellissimo)
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